<small>Our Favorites <br>& How to Watch Them:</small><br><b>Penelope Spheeris</b>

Our Favorites
& How to Watch Them:

Penelope Spheeris

Art by Jenna Newton (@jennnanewton)
Letter by Sarah Walker (@swalks)

 

Wayne’s World (1992): Have you not seen Wayne’s World yet? Okay, essentially it’s a movie about public access television and headbangers and joy and has the best, unrepeatable fourth-wall breaking ending of all time. 

WATCH NOW>>

 

The Decline of Western Civilization (1981): How many documentaries are so good that the LAPD Police Chief writes a letter demanding they never be shown in L.A. again? And then end up being one of the few films to be preserved by the Library of Congress’s National Registry  for being culturally, historically, and aesthetically significant? How many films document Los Angeles’s punk in 1979-1980 and then are followed up by two more films documenting the heavy metal scene in the 80s and then the gutter punk lifestyle of homeless teens in the late 90s? You guessed it smarties, it’s The Decline of Western Civilization and it’s GREAT.

WATCH NOW >>

<small>Our Favorites <br>& How to Watch Them:</small><br><b>Miranda July</b>

Our Favorites
& How to Watch Them:

Miranda July

Art by Paul Fittipaldi (@paulfitty)
Letter by Andrea & Caroline Donadio (@tacosnachos & @cmdonadio)

 

You and Me and Everyone We Know (2005): Watch a bunch of characters do a bunch of stuff that's somewhat right, but mostly wrong, including (but not limited to): pooping back and forth forever, performing oral sex, impressing children with fire and eulogizing a living goldfish.

WATCH NOW >>

<small>Our Favorites <br>& How to Watch Them:</small><br><b>Amy Heckerling</b>

Our Favorites
& How to Watch Them:

Amy Heckerling

Art by April Wilkins (@aprilirene)
Letter by Kristen Lange (@Kristen_Lange)

 

Clueless (1995): The one where America fell in love with Paul Rudd. And Alicia Silverstone should have won an Oscar for making a beautiful, rich, California girl so charming.

WATCH NOW >>

 

Fast Times at Ridgemont High (1982): Teens being teens being teens being teens. In Southern California. In this Cameron Crowe penned quintessential high school movie, a million future stars make their film debut, including three future Oscar winners. Also, Sean Penn is funny in it, which is weird to think about.

WATCH NOW >>

 

Look Who's Talking (1989): Another Heckling writer/director double-play. Bruce Willis plays the subconscious voice of an in-utero baby who is then born to a single mom (Kirstie Alley). Most of the movie involves said baby/toddler trying to get his mom together with the cab driver (John Travolta) that drove her to the hospital when she was in labor. Spawned two sequels, a spinoff series, and made $297 million at the box office.

WATCH NOW >>

 

 

<small>Our Favorites <br>& How to Watch Them:</small><br><b>Gurinder Chadha</b>

Our Favorites
& How to Watch Them:

Gurinder Chadha

Art by Bishakh Som (@biche_bash)
Letter by Guy Branum (@guybranum)

 

Bend It Like Beckham (2002): Spoiler: It’s less about bending it like Beckham and more about 2nd generation immigrants bending the rules and expectations set upon them.

WATCH NOW >>

 

Bhaji on the Beach (1993): Chadha’s directorial debut is an inter-cultural, intergenerational, story of racism, divorce, pregnancy, feminism, consumerism, and a seaside lights show.

WATCH NOW >>

 

Bride and Prejudice (2005): It’s Jane Austen meets Bollywood, yeah, but it’s more than just swapping saris for empire waists. Both skewer the rigid conventions of their cultures, only this one has better music.

WATCH NOW >>

 

 

<small>Our Favorites <br>& How to Watch Them:</small><br><b>Agnès Varda</b>

Our Favorites
& How to Watch Them:

Agnès Varda

Art by Danie Drankwalter (@danieblobwalter)
Letter by Samantha Shada (@SamanthaShada)

 

Faces Places (2017): Agnes Varda and French photography muralist JR travel around France in a truck that doubles as a giant printer, taking large format photos of people without power and plastering them on enormous buildings. It’s very French, very lovable, very moving and the perfect antidote to the current state of affairs.

IN THEATERS NOW >>

 

Le Pointe Courte (1955): (Un)Officially the first film in the French New Wave. Varda captures the rocky nature of love against the naturalistic backdrop of a small fishing village. Her training as a street photographer meets performances from Silvia Monfort and Philippe Noiret from the Théâtre National Populaire. All other performers are local non-actors. The story naturally evolves through Varda's lensing of the community. This is la nouvelle vague.

WATCH NOW >>

 

Le Bonheur (1965): Called "Happiness" in it's US release, this film compresses Varda's participation in the international feminist movement.  It dissects the very roles of wife, mother, and lover while showing how the women playing these roles remain purely interchangeable to the men they play them for.

WATCH NOW >>

 

Vagabond (1985): Contrasted with her previous work, in this film Varda takes the woman out of all of her pre-assumed social roles and puts her on the streets, literally, as a dead body. The film works backwards to build the identity of the female drifter.

WATCH NOW >>

 

Agnes Varda: From Here to There (2011): An episodic docu-essay on life and art following Varda through her world of fine art and cinema as rooted in her very home.  It is a story about rebirth and reinvention, about the artist constantly rising out of her own ashes.

WATCH NOW >>

 

Black Panthers aka Huey (1968): This short documents the Oakland Black Panther party's protests against the incarnation of their founder Huey P. Newton. Varda builds such empathy and compassion while fully observing the struggles faced by the Panther community.  Her cameras show the strength and beauty of Black Power because she clearly connects to the people she interviews.

WATCH NOW >>

 

Cleo from 5 to 7 (1961): Just do yourself the favor and watch it. Forget everything you learned in film school and just take it in. Life is too short not to.

WATCH NOW >>

 

Le petit amour (1988): In true vérité style Varda used this film to capture the actual coming of age of her son, Mathieu Demey, who at the time was 14 years old. Directed over the course of a summer vacation from a lose script written by actress/friend Jane Birkin, the film also features Birkin's own daughters, Charlotte Gainsbourg and Lou Doillon. Do all women fall in love with a boy? Truly, we might.

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The Beaches of Agnes (2008): An introspective autobiographical documentary about Varda as an 80 year old woman. How rare, to see the world through the eyes of a woman at all, let alone one who lives with such depth and curiosity.

WATCH NOW >>

 

 

 

<small>Our Favorites <br>& How to Watch Them:</small><br><b>Rory Kennedy</b>

Our Favorites
& How to Watch Them:

Rory Kennedy

Art by Chris Honeysuckle Ellis (@chris.honeysuckle.ellis)
Letter by Carol Weeg

 

Ethel (2012): An inside view of the life of Ethel Kennedy, as told by 7 of her children. Come for the Kennedy insights, stay for the ponies and dogs roaming the yard (Ethel loves animals!).

WATCH NOW >>

 

Ghosts of Abu Ghraib (2007): In interviews with victims, victimizers and witnesses, the story of prisoners abused by American soldiers in the Iraqi prison comes to life. Sounds grim, but it’s a fascinating examination of how average Americans got to the point of committing notorious atrocities.

WATCH NOW >>

 

Girlhood (2003): Meet Shanae and Megan—young girls who ended up in Waxter Juvenile Facility, one for murder and the other for a box cutter attack on another child. The film follows the pair through ups and downs for 3 years while they try to understand what they’ve done, what’s been done to them, and what the future may hold for them.

WATCH NOW >>

 

Street Fight (2005): A ringside seat on the contact sport that was Newark’s mayoral election in 2002. Cory Booker challenged long-time Mayor Sharpe James, who charged that the African-American Rhodes Scholar was not “really black.” The campaign quickly devolved into dirty tricks, intimidation and threats—including against the film crew!

WATCH NOW >>

 

 

<small>Our Favorites <br>& How to Watch Them:</small><br><b>Ida Lupino</b>

Our Favorites
& How to Watch Them:

Ida Lupino

Art by Justin Graham (@theClownMonkey)
Letter by Dorothy Fortenberry (@Dorothy410berry)

 

*Since I decided to write you this letter, I have learned from Wikipedia that your first movie Not Wanted is
A)  about an unplanned pregnancy, which was a pretty racy subject to tackle in 1949 (!)
B)  you directed it because the original director suffered a heart attack (!) and you stepped in all chill and just picked up directing
C)  because of its social themes, Eleanor Roosevelt (!) invited you to talk on her radio show about how women and children need less judgment and more love. Thanks for that, too.

 

The Trouble with Angels (1966): Follow Mary (Hayley Mills) and Rachel (June Harding) thru their sophomore, junior and senior years at St. Francis Academy as they prank and torment Mother Superior (Rosalind Russell)... but don't be surprised when someone has an interesting change of heart.   

WATCH NOW >>

 

What is the Bechdel Test? 
FiND OUT HERE >>

 

 

<small>Our Favorites <br>& How to Watch Them:</small><br><b>Lisa Cholodenko</b>

Our Favorites
& How to Watch Them:

Lisa Cholodenko

Letter by Amy York Rubin (@ayrubin)
Art by Charley Aldridge (@charleyaldridge)

 

High Art (1998): Syd (Radha Mitchell) is on the hunt to find the leaky bathtub that’s been dripping into her unit but instead finds Lucy (Ally Sheedy) and Greta (Patricia Clarkson) making out while high on cocaine. Oh, and there are some cool pictures in it too.  That’s all you need to know… now go watch before we ruin the rest!

WATCH NOW >>

 

The Kids Are All Right (2010): This one’s got more whoopie making fun but this time between moms Jules (Julianne Moore) and Nic (Annette Bening) and all while they watch some legit gay male porn. Enter their son Laser (Josh Hutcherson) to spoil the mood with an admission of guilt, just not the one they were expecting.

WATCH NOW >>

 

 

<small>Our Favorites <br>& How to Watch Them:</small><br><b>Kelly Reichardt</b>

Our Favorites
& How to Watch Them:

Kelly Reichardt

Art by Debbie Carlos (@DebbieCarlos)
Letter by Laura Kittrell (@LauraKittrell)

 

River of Grass (1995): Reichardt herself called this “a road movie without the road, a love story without the love, and a crime story without the crime.” There’s really no way I’m going to top that summary, so.

WATCH NOW >>

 

Old Joy (2006): A buddy film for misanthropes. Or more specifically: a film about buddies on the slow march to becoming former buddies.

WATCH NOW >>

 

Wendy and Lucy (2008): A movie about a woman and her dog. Not nearly as cute as it sounds. Unless the general idea of poverty and the recession are cute to you, in which case I guess it’s exactly as cute as it sounds.

WATCH NOW >>

 

Meek’s Cutoff (2010): The ultimate men-not-asking-for-directions story, in which Stephen Meek went and screwed over a bunch of settlers by getting them very, very lost on the Oregon Trail.

WATCH NOW >>

 

Night Moves (2014): Three eco-terrorists conspire to bomb a dam. Remember this is Kelly Reichardt, so think more character study, less Nakatomi Plaza.

WATCH NOW >>


Certain Women (2016): A triptych about several lonely women in Montana. You may think you’ve seen a melancholic movie before, but don’t talk to me until you’ve seen this one.

WATCH NOW >>

<small>Our Favorites <br>& How to Watch Them:</small><br><b>Penny Marshall</b>

Our Favorites
& How to Watch Them:

Penny Marshall

Art by Jon Krause (JonKrause.com)
Letter by Jessie Polini (@jpizzlepizzle)

 

Big (1998): After being too short to ride a carnival ride with his crush, Josh Baskin (David Moscow) makes a wish to be “Big” and turns into a 30 year old man overnight (Tom Hanks). He fakes an abduction to avoid scrutiny from his mom and flees to New York City, where, with the assistance of his best friend (Jared Rushton – look closely to spot how he wears a pin with a picture of his own face on his jacket), lands a sweet apartment, a job as an executive in a toy company, all the toys and ice cream he wants, and a hot girlfriend (Elizabeth Perkins). Watch for Jon Lovitz making a cameo as an office sexual harasser!

WATCH NOW >>

 

A League of Their Own (1992): During World War II, a group of women are drafted to play professional baseball to keep the men’s league afloat while the men are overseas. The story centers on two sisters from Oregon, Dottie and her kid sister Kit (Geena Davis and Lori Petty), a recovering alcoholic and sexist coach (Tom Hanks), and a lovable cast of teammates. Watch for Jon Lovitz making a cameo as a baseball scout!

WATCH NOW >>

 

<small>Our Favorites <br>& How to Watch Them:</small><br><b>Sarah Polley</b>

Our Favorites
& How to Watch Them:

Sarah Polley

Art by Kirsten Do (@teandonuts)
Letter by Maggie Lawson (@maggielawson)

 

Away From Her (2006): A moving look at what happens to a couple married for 40 years when one of them develops Alzheimer's. Which is to say it's kind of a bummer. And Polley casting America's sweetheart Julie Christie opposite, um, Canada's sweetheart Gordon Pinsent just twists the knife even further.

WATCH NOW >>
 

 

Take This Waltz (2011): Here at iheartfemaledirectors.com, the only thing we’re sure of is that we love movies about ambivalence. Even more so when they star Michelle Williams, screen princess of nuance. But don’t be mistaken – you’re not in for a moody subtlety party with this one, which also stars Seth Rogan as Michelle’s husband and Sarah Silverman as her troubled sister, Geraldine. And do you want to hear the best thing today? It’s streaming on Netflix now.

WATCH NOW >>

 

Stories We Tell (2012): A documentary about storytelling and family. That sounds vague, but you shouldn't learn more than that before you watch. Go in cold. Honestly, just trust our recommendations at this point.

WATCH NOW >>

 

 

<small>Our Favorites <br>& How to Watch Them:</small><br><b>Nancy Meyers</b>

Our Favorites
& How to Watch Them:

Nancy Meyers

Letter by Toby Herman (@tobyherman27)
Art by Charley Aldridge (@charleyaldridge)

 

The Holiday (2006): If you want to fall in love with falling in love, you need this movie in your life. It’s a modern day love letter to Old Hollywood, with Kate Winslet and Cameron Diaz swapping lives in an effort to actually get one. It feels like a black and white movie you’d cuddle up with on a snowy day. Is there anything better?

WATCH NOW >>

 

The Parent Trap (1998): It’s rare that a remake feels worthy, but this one is an absolute delight. Not only does it honor the original with several sly winks – but it boasts double the Lindsay Lohan trying to reunite her estranged parents, Dennis Quaid and Natasha Richardson (broken heart emoji). Fun Fact: Nancy named the twins after her own daughters, Hallie and Annie!

WATCH NOW >>

 

<small>Our Favorites <br>& How to Watch Them:</small><br><b>Nanfu Wang</b>

Our Favorites
& How to Watch Them:

Nanfu Wang

Art by Chau Nguyen (@rckshw)
Letter by Wendy Cohen (@wendynuale)

 

Hooligan Sparrow (2016): A high tension documentary following Chinese activist Ye Haiyan (aka Hooligan Sparrow) and other activists marked as enemies of the states as they seek justice in the case of six elementary school girls sexually abused by their principal. A documentary filmmaker’s primer in how to persevere.

<small>Our Favorites <br>& How to Watch Them:</small><br><b>Claudia Weill</b>

Our Favorites
& How to Watch Them:

Claudia Weill

Art by Ching Lan (@chingaling_draws)
Letter by Laura Kittrell (@LauraKittrell)

 

Girlfriends (1978): Girlfriends is the OG Frances Ha. You know, a movie that is sort of structured like a love story but in just a friendship way to tell the story of two ladies who are each other's constant plus ones until one of them moves in with a dude.

WATCH NOW >>

 

GIRLS (2013), “Boys” - Season 2 Episode 6: This is the one where Ray and Adam go to Staten Island to return a stolen dog.

WATCH NOW >>

 

My So-Called Life (1994): Claudia directed a bunch of these and you can stream them now on Hulu.

WATCH NOW >>

 

Once and Again (1999-2002): This show is a shared passion among co-founders here at iheartfemaledirectors.com but it’s not available anywhere except a DVD box set on Amazon. If anyone wants to start a campaign to get this baby online, let us know.

WATCH NOW >>

 

<small>Our Favorites <br>& How to Watch Them:</small><br><b>Lana Wachowski</b>

Our Favorites
& How to Watch Them:

Lana Wachowski

Art by Amanda Speva (@aspeva)
Letter by Charley Aldridge (@charleyaldridge)

 

The Matrix (1999): The first film in a trilogy about computer hacker turned savior of the "not so free" world. Starring Keanu Reeves (Neo), Laurence Fishburne (Morpheus) and Carrie-Anne Moss (Trinity). 

WATCH NOW >>

 

Sense8 (2015-2018): This truly beautiful television series is about 8 people who share something special in common and like to have some seriously sexy orgies of the mind.

WATCH NOW ON NETFLIX >>

 

 

 

<small>Our Favorites <br>& How to Watch Them:</small><br><b>Dorothy Arzner</b>

Our Favorites
& How to Watch Them:

Dorothy Arzner

Art by Lisa Predko (@lpredko)

 

Christopher Strong (1933): This one’s about a love affair between a female pilot and a member of British Parliament. And it’s as good as that description makes it sound. Also, if you’ve ever seen that photo of Katharine Hepburn wearing a crazy silver moth costume that the internet loves so much, it’s from this movie, and that alone is worth the price of admission.

WATCH NOW >>

 

Dance, Girl, Dance (1940): Maureen O’Hara and Lucille Ball play rival dancers but in kind of an empowered female sort of way. O’Hara is a classical ballerina and Lucille Ball is, well, promiscuous, so that dichotomy gets a lot of play. There’s also some pretty fun 1940s burlesque if that’s your thing. And if you need any extra motivation to watch this, you should probably know that Lucille Ball’s character’s name is Bubbles.

WATCH NOW >> 

 

 

<small>Our Favorites <br>& How to Watch Them:</small><br><b>Susan Seidelman</b>

Our Favorites
& How to Watch Them:

Susan Seidelman

Art by John Jennings (@jenningsjohn)

 

Smithereens (1982): Susan Berman (not the one Robert Durst definitely murdered) plays Wren, a woman who makes consistently bad choices in New York’s 1980s punk scene. In the last moments you get to see Chris Noth (Mr. Big!) as a male prostitute extra, which is fun.

WATCH NOW >>

 

Desperately Seeking Susan (1985): Rosanna Arquette is a stifled housewife with a jerk husband. Madonna is Madonna. You’ll learn how to dry your pits with a public bathroom hand dryer and look cool as shit eating cheese puffs in your bra by the pool. (Currently on Amazon Prime!)

WATCH NOW >>

 

She-Devil (1989): Roseanne Barr is a stifled housewife. Meryl Streep does her first comic role. Ed Begley Jr. is so good as the greedy, lascivious, self-absorbed husband that Roger Ebert said in his 1989 review of the film he hoped Begley Jr. was being “groomed for a Donald Trump story.” (As of now you can stream it on a website called tubiTV for free - with ads)

WATCH NOW >>

 

Sex and the City (1998): "That's the show about four women acting like gay guys.” - Marge Simpson. Still- check out the first season, our favorite.

WATCH NOW >>

 

 

<small>Our Favorites <br>& How to Watch Them:</small><br><b>Dee Rees</b>

Our Favorites
& How to Watch Them:

Dee Rees

Art by Bo (@bomonstre)

 

Pariah (feature, 2011): An African-American teenager struggles with her identity as a butch lesbian. Contains everything you want from an indie movie -- heartache, bad moms, great cinematography, a dramatic turn from a Wayans sibling -- and then some.

WATCH NOW >>

 

Pariah (short, 2007): Like the feature but shorter.

WATCH NOW >>

 

Bessie (2015): Can you believe a biopic of Bessie Smith starring Queen Latifah didn’t exist until 2015? I know. It’s insane. Bonus: Mo’Nique as Ma Rainey.

WATCH NOW >>

 

 

 

<small>Our Favorites <br>& How to Watch Them:</small><br><b>Jennifer Kent</b>

Our Favorites
& How to Watch Them:

Jennifer Kent

Art by Peter Frederiksen (@pefrederiksen)

 

The Babadook (2014): She’s a single mom. And a widow. And her kid is no piece of cake. As if all that weren’t enough, a mysterious children’s book appears in her house and starts to haunt her and her family. Laura and I recommended this movie to a waiter once and the next time Laura went to that restaurant he chased her down to tell her how much he loved it. So ask yourself, if the director of The Exorcist and a random waiter’s raves aren’t enough to get you to clicky clicky on a movie available on Netflix, what is?

WATCH NOW >>

 

<small>Our Favorites <br>& How to Watch Them:</small><br><b>Alice Guy-Blaché</b>

Our Favorites
& How to Watch Them:

Alice Guy-Blaché

Art by Charley Aldridge (@charleyaldridge)

 

Résultats du féminisme (The Consequences of Feminism) (1906): Look, we usually wouldn’t post youtube links but if you’re into silent film, it’s actually an okay place to look around. Since silent film pre-dates things like royalties for artists or their estates, we feel okay about it. Here is a link blessed with a turned-off comments section.

WATCH NOW >>

 

La Fée aux Choux (The Cabbage Fairy) (1896): Either the first or second narrative film ever made. It reveals the big secret of how babies are made (ripped unceremoniously from cabbage patches). It’s :50 long and involves rough handling of two crying babies and a terrible prop baby that everyone on youtube thinks is a real dead baby. Look, we’re not saying it’s a good film, we’re just saying it’s historical.  

WATCH NOW >>

 

A collection of Alice Guy-Blaché films: These are all available on the subscription service Fandor, which if you’re a real silent film nerd, you probably already know about.Falling Leaves (1912) - A little girl tries to save her sister’s life before the last leaf falls. See Alice’s favorite direction “be natural” shine with a genuinely good performance from the child actress.

WATCH NOW >>

 

Falling Leaves (1912): A little girl tries to save her sister’s life before the last leaf falls. See Alice’s favorite direction “be natural” shine with a genuinely good performance from the child actress.

WATCH NOW >>

 

 

<small>Our Favorites <br>& How to Watch Them:</small><br><b>Maren Ade</b>

Our Favorites
& How to Watch Them:

Maren Ade

Art by Joey Elkins (@joeyelkins)

 

Forest For the Trees (2005): A first-year teacher moves to the big city and tries to make a friend. For anyone who’s ever lived the brutal combination of social weirdness and self awareness.

WATCH NOW >>
(currently available for free for Amazon Prime members!)

 

Everyone Else (2009): Have you ever been in a relationship that had already expired and then you go on vacation and get lost? What about one where the day-to-day of the relationship depended on your partner’s confidence level at any given moment? Have you ever had dinner guests who stayed too long and you wanted to stick a knife in their face and tell them to GTFO? This is all of the above.

WATCH NOW >>

 

Toni Erdmann (2016): A businesswoman’s hippie prankster father shows up and won’t leave her alone. It’s about parents wanting their adult children to be happy and adult children not knowing how to connect and look, just call your parents okay? They love you and want to know more about your life. Watch this before the American remake just in case it’s a bummer.

WATCH NOW >>

<small>Our Favorites <br>& How to Watch Them:</small><br><b>Chantal Akerman</b>

Our Favorites
& How to Watch Them:

Chantal Akerman

Art by Charley Aldridge (@charleyaldridge)

 

Narrative Films:

Jeanne Dielman, 23, Quai du Commerce, 1080 Bruxelles (1975): Delphine Seyrig plays a widowed housewife who does chores in real time in front of you and has paid sex behind closed doors. It’s a film that teaches us that long takes can give weight to characters’ lives like nothing else and that prostitutes can wear cardigans. And look, if you can’t hang with slow European cinema, go ahead and skip it. But if you self-identify as a film nerd and haven’t seen this movie, please stop embarrassing yourself and get the DVD on Criterion or sign up for Filmstruck.

WATCH NOW>>

 

Je Tu Il Elle (1974): Chantal Akerman plays the lead character here and eats a ton of granulated sugar from a spoon and then scissors possibly more than anyone has ever scissored on film before (yes, including Blue is the Warmest Color). There’s not a ton in the way of plot, but I would hope that sugar and scissoring would sell you on it.

WATCH NOW>> 

 

Documentaries:  

News From Home (1977): If you’ve ever loved New York, what are you even doing right now if you’re not watching this movie? And if you’ve ever loved walks, I’ll ask you the same question. It’s peak Chantal Akerman: all long takes and voiceover as Akerman reads letters from her mother over shots of her favorite walking spots in New York.

WATCH NOW>> 

 

No Home Movie (2015): I’ll be honest: this is a rough one. Not only is it a documentary about conversations between Akerman and her mother (an Auschwitz survivor) that took place right before her mother’s death, it’s also the last film Akerman made before taking her own life. But if you can set aside some post-movie decompression time, it’s pretty close to a masterpiece and more than worth the amount you’re going to cry watching it.

WATCH NOW>>

 

 

 

<small>Our Favorites & How to Watch Them:</small><br><b>Reed Morano</b>

Our Favorites & How to Watch Them:
Reed Morano

Art by Jeff Sciortino (@SciortinoPhoto)

 

The Handmaid's Tale (2017): A system of government that overwhelmingly favors rich white men strips the rights of pretty much everyone else and so a bunch of people start #resist-ing. Who comes up with this stuff?!

WATCH NOW >>

 

Meadowland (2015): Luke Wilson and Olivia Wilde. Elisabeth Moss and John Leguizamo. Merritt Wever who you don’t know you know but you do know and she is one of my favorite actresses. Something bad happens to a kid but y’all ate up Manchester by the Sea so why not this? Like I said - I haven’t seen it, but Laura says it’s good and we should all listen to Laura. Plus it’s on Netflix right now!

WATCH NOW >>

 

Halt and Catch Fire, Season 3, Episode 8, “You Are Not Safe”: Go read this excellent recap of Season One and then forget everything because the show dramatically shifts for seasons two and three and is roughly ten billion times better. It’s also on Netflix right now, you lucky ducks!

WATCH NOW >>

 

 

 

 

<small>Our Favorites & How to Watch Them:</small><br><b>Gillian Armstrong</b>

Our Favorites & How to Watch Them:
Gillian Armstrong

Art by Katherine Brown (kcbrowndesign.com)

 

My Brilliant Career: The Gillian Armstrong movie about a headstrong woman growing up, choosing between the love of her childhood friend and a new suitor, and writing a novel about her experiences that isn’t called Little Women.

WATCH NOW >>

 

Little Women: If you don’t know what Little Women is about at this point in your life, I am so confused as to how you found this site and genuinely want to know everything about you.

WATCH NOW >>

 

Oscar and Lucinda: The titular Oscar and Lucinda bet each other that Oscar can’t transport a glass church that Lucinda has made across Australia by Good Friday. Complications arise. Like a lot of complications.

WATCH NOW >>

 

Charlotte Grey: Cate Blanchett plays -- you guessed it -- Charlotte Gray, a British lady spy who works with the French Resistance to defeat the Nazis.

WATCH NOW >>

 

 

 

<small>Our Favorites & How to Watch Them:</small><br><b>Elaine May</b>

Our Favorites & How to Watch Them:
Elaine May

Art by Hilary Fitzgerald Campbell (@CartoonbyHilary)

 

A Nichols & May Sketch 
WATCH NOW ON YOUTUBE >>

 

What is the Bechdel Test? 
FiND OUT HERE >>

 

A New Leaf (1971): The blackest of black comedies. Walter Matthau is a playboy who burns through his family’s inheritance and loses his damn mind trying to maintain a certain lifestyle. Instead of killing himself -- which he briefly considers -- he decides to try to marry into money. He meets Elaine May, who plays that classic combination of botany professor/heiress, and considers murdering her, but -- oops -- starts to fall for her instead.

WATCH NOW>>  

 

Mikey and Nicky (1976): Peter Falk and John Cassavetes play a couple of friends trying to escape a hitman/the mob/general bad stuff but find the real problem they should be confronting is their own friendship.

WATCH NOW>>

 

Ishtar (1987): A couple of terrible songwriters (Warren Beatty and Dustin Hoffman) can’t get work in the U.S. and decide to head to Morocco to become lounge singers, as one does. They then get mixed up in a plot to overthrow the Emir of (fake nearby country) Ishtar… as one does.

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<small>Our Favorites & How to Watch Them:</small><br><b>Gina Prince-Bythewood</b>

Our Favorites & How to Watch Them:
Gina Prince-Bythewood

Art by Mike Aldrich (@the_getting_monster)

 

Love & Basketball (2000): Two neighbors share a love of basketball and eventually (spoilers) each other. The movie follows them from childhood to adulthood as they fall in love and out of love and back in love, with a ton of flirty basketball along the way.

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Beyond the Lights (2014): A police officer saves a pop star from attempting suicide, and then they fall in love. I know feminist alarm bells are going off in your head from reading that description, but please just trust that it’s not that.

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